Posts Tagged ‘finances’

Phone Scams

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

Here are NJFA, we like to make sure we are keeping folks aware of scams and fraud issues. Our February episode of Aging Insights, is titled, Stop Identity Theft and features two guests that will help viewers to protect themselves. We also want to address a scam that’s been in the news.

Recently, news outlets across the United States reported on a new scam referred to as the “can you hear me?” telephone scam. According to those reports, the scam begins with an unsolicited phone call. After the caller makes contact they ask the recipient “Can you hear me?” to elicit a response of “yes,” and a potential onslaught of unauthorized charges ensues.

The story goes that if you get this call and respond “yes” to the question, “can you hear me?” that the scammer could be recording it and could use it against you. There is the possibility that you could receive a bill for something you did not purchase or agree to and when you go to dispute the bill you will be presented with your own voice saying “yes” on the recording.

The first thing we want to warn readers about is if you don’t know the caller or are suspicious of their intent, you should always hang up. Do not give personal information or engage the caller in conversation if you have doubts about the legitimacy of the call. You should also contact the appropriate authority to report any issues or to verify any information you are given on the call. For example, if the caller claims to be from your utility company, call the # on your monthly statement to verify your account status or any issues.

After some additional research, we’d also like you to know what some investigators have discovered about this scam. According to the fact-finding website, Snopes, “we haven’t yet been able to identify any scenario under which a scammer could authorize charges in another person’s name simply by possessing a voice recording of that person saying “yes,” without also already possessing a good deal of personal and account information for that person, and without being able to reproduce any other form of verbal response from that person.” That doesn’t mean it cannot happen, just that the reports thus far only support the threat and not any actual monetary charges.

The Snopes article adds, “In all the news reports we found, interviewees merely reported having been asked the common question (“Can you hear me?”) but did not state that they themselves had fallen prey to scammers.”

That being said, we still advice you to use caution when receiving unsolicited phone calls, hanging up is ok. And if you have any scams or crimes to report, contact your local police, the Federal Trade Commission (www.ftc.gov/complaint or 1-877-438-4338), and/or your local Better Business Bureau.

 

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Money saving tips

Friday, September 13th, 2013

Money saving tips

Here are some great tips for saving money. We gathered these from various sources, to learn more about each follow the links provided or contact a trusted financial advisor. 

Find your pension

To see if you or someone you know has an unclaimed pension-Search.pbgc.gov

Free credit monitoring

Creditsesame.com

Catch-up

If you are 50 or over you can contribute an extra $5,500 to your 401K plan as a catch up contribution in 2013

 Family ties

If adult children or grandchildren live with you it may mean special tax breaks. Ask your tax preparer about claiming dependents for family members you support.

Save on stamps

Paying bills online means not buying stamps

Free credit report

Don’t pay for credit reports. Get a free copy once a year from three companies- Equifax, TransUnion and Experian. Visit annualcreditreport.com

Selling your home?

The best day of the week to list your home for sale is Friday and the worst is Sunday. according to an analysis by a major real-estate brokerage firm. Listings on Fridays sell faster and for more money.

Save money on medications

Ask your doctor for free samples. Drug company reps drop them off all the time.

Skip the ER

If you have a non-life-threatening medical issue, like fevers, cuts, minor burns or headaches. Urgent care centers with walk-in features are more affordable and usually are open 7 days a week.

Grow it

If you put the stub of romaine lettuce in a glass of water and place it in a sunny spot it will grow back, the same is true of celery, spring onions and cabbage.

Weigh your options

If you need only a few vegetables or fruits for a recipe or meal, buying a small amount from the salad bar at your supermarket may be cheaper than buying a bag of precut vegetables.

Check it out

Instead of buying a book, why not visit your local library and borrow it.

Service advisory

If you get your car serviced at the dealer, ask to check for any service advisories. You might save on a repair that is covered.

Compare 401 (k) fees

Financial information company, BrightScope features free 401 (K) ratings directory that compares fees among plans. Check it out at brightscope.com/ratings

Tips from NJ Dept of Banking and Insurance May Help Those Filing Insurance Claims

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

An article in today’s (9/1) Trenton Times by Jarrett Renshaw, Statehouse Bureau, talks about information from the NJ Dept. of Banking and Insurance (DOBI) Commissioner, Tom Considine regarding the recent storm and insurance claims.

In a memo on Monday (8/29) the Commissioner stated that “Irene did not generate sustained hurrican-force winds, defined as 74 mph, but the time it got to NJ and told insurers they could not apply the hurricane deductible when calculating how much homeowners should pay for damages.”

So, what does this mean? It means, that homeowners across NJ could save a lot of money. Apparently, hurricane deductibles are much higher than the standard deductible on homeowner insurance policies. According to the article, “The hurricane deductible is often a percentage of the property’s value, ranging from 1 to 4 %… for example, a policy holder whoe home is insured for $200,000 with a 2 % hurricane deductible would have to pay the first $4,000 to repair hurricane damage. But in this case, the homeowner is only responsible for the first $500 to $1,000.”

NJ State Law says a hurricane deductible applies when the National Weather Service measures sustained hurricane winds above 74 mph, Irene’s peak winds were 71 mph, a small difference in mph but a big difference in out of pocket dollars for NJ homeowners who were affected by the storm.

It is good to know when contacting your insurance company, that they have been notified by DOBI that Irene was not classified as a hurricane and therefore you will pay your regular deductible on your homeowners insurance policy and not the higher hurricane deductible.

The link below will take you to the NJ Department of Banking and Insurance Website where you can see more storm related updates or contact them for questions.

http://www.state.nj.us/dobi/division_consumers/insurance/hurricane.htm#after

Do you know how much you need to retire in New Jersey?

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

A recent survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute reports that 43% of workers say they have less than $10,000 in savings. The annual survey, Retirement Confidence Survey, included 1,153 respondents age 25 and older who were employed or retired. 27% indicated they had less than $1,000 in savings. On top of that 24% reported that they had to delay retirement. The survey did not account of the value of homes or defined-benefit pension programs.

They also found that only 69% of workers have reported saving for retirement. Research Director and co-author of the survey, Jack VanDerhei stated that the current economic situation is not the only factor, but that people don’t plan soon enough. The survey also reveals that only 46% of respondents attempted to calculate how much money they’d need in retirement, meaning over half of the respondents have not even begun calculating what they’ll need to retire.

 Planning for retirement sooner rather than later seems like a good idea. But where do you start? It can be a difficult and overwhelming task. You may need to consult a financial planner, but you can also start by looking at the NJ-Elder Economic Security Index.

The NJ Elder Index can help to determine how much an individual will need to retire in your community. This is because the Index shows the cost of living for someone over 65 in all 21 counties in NJ. It is comprised of the costs of housing, food, transportation, healthcare and a miscellaneous category. The Index also reflects the expenses of renting versus owning a home and also the difference in having mortgage or not. The data is also shown for singles as well as couples in each county.

The Statewide Index shows that a single renter in New Jersey needs $25,941 to meet their basic expenses, while a single homeowner with a mortgage would need $33,570. Some findings may point to key elements for retirement planning. Notably, those 65 and over with a mortgage could be paying twice as much as someone who does not have a mortgage. Housing is the biggest expense in an elder’s budget with healthcare being a close second.

An important contact for Seniors to learn about local resources is their county Office on Aging. To find the Office on Aging in your county visit, http://www.njfoundationforaging.org/services.html

Knowing what some of the costs are can help, but certainly the recent difficult economy has had an impact on the ability to save for retirement. Many New Jerseyans are struggling to make ends meet, let alone save for the future.

To view information from New Jersey Elder Economic Security Index follow the links below. If you have questions or need more information, contact us at office@njfoundationforaging.org or 609-421-0206.

Elder Index

Policy Brief

County Fact Sheets