Posts Tagged ‘older adults’

Medicare Hospice Benefit

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Medicare Hospice Benefit

Hospice and other end of life issues are not things we often want to talk about. However, being prepared and knowing all your options is a good idea.

We should start by describing hospice. Hospice is a program of care and support for people who are terminally ill. The focus is usually on providing comfort instead of treatment. It is a choice a patient needs to make with their doctor and family. Hospice programs also offer assistance and services to family members during the process of caring for the patient.

If you have Medicare it will cover hospice services. The Medicare hospice benefit covers your care and you shouldn’t have to go outside of hospice to get care (except in very rare situations).

Once you choose hospice care, your hospice benefit should cover everything you need. All Medicare-covered services you get while in hospice care are covered under Original Medicare, even if you were previously in a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO) or other Medicare health plan.

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) covers Hospice care if you meet these conditions:

Your hospice doctor and your regular doctor certify that you’re terminally ill (with a life expectancy of 6 months or less).

You accept palliative care (for comfort) instead of care to cure your illness.

You sign a statement choosing hospice care instead of other Medicare-covered treatments for your terminal illness and related conditions.

Palliative care means that the medical team will focus on relieving the patient’s pain and any other symptoms, including mental stress. Only your hospice doctor and your regular doctor can certify that you’re terminally ill and have 6 months or less to live.

To start the process you meet with your doctor to discuss all options. Medicare covers a one-time only hospice consultation with a hospice medical director or doctor to discuss your care options and management of your pain and symptoms. This one-time consultation is available to you, even if you decide not to get hospice care.

Medicare will cover the hospice care you get for your terminal illness and related conditions, but the care you get must be from a Medicare-approved hospice program.

Hospice care is can be given in your home. Although depending on your needs and wishes, there are also inpatient programs available. That is one of the things you will discuss with the hospice program (and your loved ones). Together you will create a plan of care that can include any or all of these services:

Doctor services

Nursing care

Medical equipment (like wheelchairs or walkers)

Medical supplies (like bandages and catheters)

Prescription drugs

Hospice aide and homemaker services

Physical and occupational therapy

Speech-language pathology services

Social worker services

Dietary counseling

Grief and loss counseling for you and your family

Short-term inpatient care (for pain and symptom management)

Short-term respite care

Any other Medicare-covered services needed to manage your terminal illness and related conditions, as recommended by your hospice team

You can find out more information at medicare.gov or by calling them at 1-800-Medicare. Hospice specific information and resources are available at https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/hospice-and-respite-care.html

You can also talk to your physician about your options and care available in your area.

This information is meant to inform you of coverage available to you should you need it. Don’t be afraid to talk openly with your family about end of life decisions.

 

Medicare Coverage

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

Medicare coverage

What does Medicare cover? It’s a common, but also complex question. Medicare has 2 basic parts, Part A, which is known as hospital insurance (we’ll define that in a minute) and Part B, which covers services, such as lab tests, doctor visits, etc. Part A and Part B together are known as Original Medicare.

Medicare recipients also have the choice to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan (also known as Part C) which is delivered by an HMO. This coverage differs from Original Medicare not only in the delivery of benefits but also what is covered. There are many different plan options under Medicare Advantage and you can learn more at medicare.gov

When it comes to Original Medicare, coverage works like this:

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) covers inpatient hospital stays, care in a skilled nursing facility, hospice care, and some home health care. To sum it up, Part A covers:

  • Hospital care
  • Skilled nursing facility care or Nursing home care (as long as custodial care isn’t the only care you need)*
  • Hospice (provided by a Medicare approved program, either at home or an inpatient setting)**
  • Home health services

**Keep a look out for a blog post on Medicare Coverage of Hospice Services coming soon.

*This is where some of the complexity of Medicare comes in. When a patient is sent to a nursing home/rehab facility for rehabilitation, Medicare covers your stay on a short term basis. Medicare does not pay for “long term care” or “custodial care”. If needed, Medicare will cover your rehab stay for 20 days at 100%, on day 21 (should you still need to be there) you will be responsible for a 20% copay. The maximum amount of rehab time Medicare will pay for is 100 days, so from day 21 to day 100 you would pay 20% of the cost. If you or a loved one are in a situation where you have to be in a rehab facility for more than 20 days, you should definitely be thinking about your options and what your plan for long term care is. At that point you should have already had a meeting with the discharge planner if not an interdisciplinary team at the facility.

Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers certain doctors’ services, outpatient care, medical supplies, and preventive services. Part B covers 2 types of services:

  • Medically necessary services: Services or supplies that are needed to diagnose or treat your medical condition and that meet accepted standards of medical practice.
  • Preventive services: Health care to prevent illness (like the flu) or detect it at an early stage, when treatment is most likely to work best.

Preventive services include screenings such as, mammograms, colonoscopies, bone mass measurements, and other cancer screenings, if your doctor thinks you are at risk. You also get a Welcome to Medicare visit within your first 12 months of enrollment, during this visit you can talk to your doctor about screenings and review your medical history. In addition to the Welcome to Medicare visit, you are entitled to an Annual Wellness visit. You pay nothing for most preventive services if you get the services from a health care provider who accepts assignment.

Part B covers things like:

  • Ambulance services
  • Durable medical equipment (DME)
  • Mental health
    • Inpatient
    • Outpatient
    • Partial hospitalization
  • Getting a second opinion before surgery
  • Limited outpatient prescription drugs

The fourth part of Medicare is Part D, which is prescription drug coverage. With Original Medicare prescriptions are not paid for, therefore you should obtain a separate Medicare Part D plan.

To learn more about all the parts of Medicare and to explore your options, such as, Original Medicare (Part A & B), Medicare Advantage (Part C) and Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D) visit https://www.medicare.gov/ or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

You can also contact your local SHIP (State Health Insurance Assistance Program) through you County- find their contact information at: http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/doas/home/sashipsite.html or call the SHIP Information Center at 1-800-792-8820.

 

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NJFA Founding Trustee Given National Recognition

Thursday, October 1st, 2015

NJFA Founding Trustee Given National Recognition

Trenton— The New Jersey Foundation for Aging (NJFA) is pleased to announce that founding trustee, Carl West was recently recognized by the National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD). In honor of the 50th Anniversary of the Older American’s Act, NASUAD honored more than 50 advocates who are dedicated to Aging and Disability Services. Carl West, who is a Founding Trustee and first Board Chair of NJFA, is also the former Executive Director of the Mercer County Office on Aging.

The honorees that were selected are featured in a publication from NASUAD titled, Celebrating 50 Years with 50+ Fabulous Older People, which is available online at http://www.nasuad.org/. Carl was recognized for his advocacy both in New Jersey and nationally. At the time of his retirement, Carl was the longest serving area agency on aging director in the country. In addition to being a founding member of NJFA, Carl has also been involved with and founding member of numerous other organizations. Locally, Carl was an integral part of the NJ Association of Area Agencies on Aging, serving as founding director, legislative chair and president. Nationally, Carl has been a long-standing board member of the National Caucus and Center on Black Aged, where he served as the Chairman of their National Board.

Even in his retirement, Carl continues to be involved, following important proceedings, such as the recent White House Conference on Aging. NJFA joins, NASUAD in saluting Carl for his dedication to the aging network, older adults and caregivers.

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Social Security Facts

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Social Security Facts

Recently, NJFA Deputy Director, Melissa Chalker sat down with two representatives from the Social Security Administration for a taping of our half hour TV program Aging Insights.

Given all of the extensive information they shared, we thought it was time to do a blog about Social Security benefits and what you need to know. Be sure to tune into the show in September, in the meantime, here are some facts.

Social Security is a family insurance program. It is meant to be additional income for those who are retired, disabled, widowed, etc. Eligibility for retirement benefits is based on your work history (the # of credits you earned while working and paying into the Social Security system) and your age. Depending on the year you were born, your retirement age could be anywhere between 65 and 67 years of age. You can receive your benefits starting at age 62, however it will be a reduced benefit because you are choosing to receive it early. Reduction amounts are calculated based on when your official retirement age should be.

All of this information and more is available at sss.gov or by calling 1-800-772-1213. You can start a my social security account online, look up information about Social Security and/or Medicare benefits and even apply for benefits online. A my social security account is available for anyone over 18 who is working, it helps you to track your Social Security record, estimate your benefit and much more. Social Security’s website is safe and secure, be sure to sign up for your account and create your own user name and password to protect your identity.

Many people don’t know that Social Security benefits are also for family members of a retired person. If a retired individual has minor children, disabled children and/or a spouse caring for a minor child, those family members may also be eligible for a monthly benefit. More information about those benefits are available by contacting Social Security or creating a my social security account to see what benefits you and your family could receive.

Information about benefits for spouses, survivors, disabled individuals and more is available at ssa.gov or by calling 1-800-772-1213 (Mon- Fri).

 

Robo-Call Scams

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

Robo-Call Scams

Here at NJFA, both Grace and I (Melissa) have received calls on our cell phones claiming to be from “Cardholder Services”. The recorded voice does not specify the credit card company but urges you to contact them about your account.

We’ve also heard recently from others who have received similar calls, as well as calls from people posing as the IRS. The most recent call I received even came from a local phone number and not a 1-800 number. Apparently there is technology that allows the scammer to change how the # they are calling from appears on your caller ID, so it may look legitimate.

I checked the Better Business Bureau (BBB) website and found that the call I got is a well known scam. The voice on the recording identified herself as “Rachel from cardholder services”. The article on the BBB’s website was from 2014 and indicated that this scam had already been going on for years.

The concept of this scam is no different from the others, the caller wants you to either pay for a “service”, or provide personal information (like account numbers or Social Security Numbers). You should not do either. If the caller claims to be from your bank or credit card company, hang up, look up the correct contact information for your bank or credit card company and call that # to verify any account concerns.

It is also important to remember that the IRS, Social Security, and most government agencies are not going to call you. The IRS specifically will always send you a letter first about any money owed. The current IRS scam involves a caller identifying themselves as an IRS employee and demanding immediate payment via a wire transfer or pre-paid debit card. If the victim refuses to cooperate, they are then threatened with arrest, deportation or suspension of a business or driver’s license. In many cases, the caller becomes hostile and insulting.

With any scam, the request for a pre-paid debit card should be a red flag. This is the scammers preferred way of getting your money. The IRS, and most likely any legitimate entity will not demand payment via a specific method, such as pre-paid debt cards or wire transfers.

You should report all incidents to your local authorities, in addition you may find these helpful as well:

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) phishing@irs.gov or 1-800-366-4484.

Better Business Bureau at http://www.bbb.org

Federal Trade Commission https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/#crnt&panel1-1

NJ Division of Consumer Affairs 1-800-242-5846 or www.njconsumeraffairs.gov

Announcing NJFA’s 17th Annual Conference!

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

Announcing NJFA’s 17th Annual Conference!

NJFA will hold its 17th Annual Conference on Wednesday, June 3rd at the Crowne Plaza Monroe. The 2015 Keynote Speakers are James Firman, CEO of NCOA and Nora Dowd Eisenhower, Assistant Director of the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau Office of Financial Protection for Older Americans. Jim Firman will address the crowd in the morning. Heis recognized leader and advocate in the field of aging. Mr. Firman will discuss a variety of topics including key aspects of the political and legislative landscape, such as the White House Conference on Aging and the Affordable Care Act. He will also talk about NCOA’s work on Elder Justice, Economic Security, Benefits Check-up, Senior Hunger and evidence based programs.

Ms. Dowd Eisenhower will be the luncheon keynote speaker and will discuss the mission and structure of the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the specific role of the Office for Older Americans. She will also talk about CFPB tools/guides on financial decisions such as reverse mortgages or choosing a financial advisor. This will include two programs from CFPB that look at preventing elder financial exploitation and guides created for powers of attorney, etc.

The 2015 conference workshop speakers will include policy makers, direct care & clinical practice specialists. Topics include Dental Health and Oral Cancer Screenings, Addiction and Gambling in Older Adults, New Models of Care, Elder Bullying and more.

More information and registration can be found on NJFA’s website at www.njfoundationforaging.org Limited vendor space and sponsorships remain, call us at 609-421-0206, email at office@njfoundationforaging.org or check out the website for details.

The New Jersey Foundation for Aging (NJFA) is a public charity with the primary goal to empower elders to live in the community with independence and dignity.slide_01

 

Job hunting over 50

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Job hunting over 50

Looking for a new job over 50 might not sound like an easy task, but it is possible. And there are some steps you can take to increase your success.

Keep busy. Be a self starter. You can remain active by consulting, writing articles or blogs. It’s a mistake to take too much of a break. Keeping in touch with colleagues is also great. Keep them up to date on what you are doing and ask what is going on in their field. Networking can be a very beneficial thing, you can even look into attending networking meetings.

Be up to date. Email accounts with aol or yahoo are considered out dated. You may want to look into creating a gmail account (google) or using outlook. You want your email address to look professional and convey who you are, so no cute nicknames. Your email address should be your name and maybe something to indicate your profession or field of interest. For example, mchalkerSW@gmail.com

It’s good to be careful about your online persona, but being completely unable to find is not good either. An online job search expert, Susan P Joyce said, “the biggest mistake I see is older job seekers confusing privacy with invisibility”. You can create a Facebook account and/or a Linkedin profile where you can share information about yourself or things relevant to your line of work. Remember to keep it professional, no pictures of you getting drunk at a party or inappropriate posts like off-collar jokes.

You may be able to negotiate a few perks when offered a job for less money than you were hoping. Holding out for a job that pays more is not always the best move, that job may not be out there. It may be necessary to accept a job that is below your asking salary. However, you may be able to ask for more flextime, vacation days or another perk. Do some research on what jobs in your field of interest are paying, this will help you be prepared when asked what salary you are looking for.

It’s also good to be prepared in regard to your resume. It’s a good idea to ask for help from friends or family, but you can also get professional resume assistance. And keep it short, no one wants to read a five page resume. Recruiters get a lot of resumes, keeping it short and sweet is key, limit your work history to your most recent jobs. Highlight your skills. And proofread, nothing turns people off more than typos.

And don’t forget to check your wardrobe. If you’ve been working in a business casual environment, you may have to spend some money updating. Make sure your clothing fits and is not obviously out of date.

Do your research on any company you are interviewing with. You want to sound knowledgeable when you meet with them and you also want to be able to say why you will be a good asset. And be prepared to ask the interviewer questions too. Don’t say no if you are asked if you have any questions, come prepared with a few to ask.

Apply for a job even if you don’t meet all of the “job requirements”. I think this is good advice for job seekers of any age. Employers aren’t necessarily looking for someone to have all of the skills they list in a job description, if you meet a number of skills on the list and have other good qualities like a good work history you might be just the person they are looking for!

You can find assistance at

NJ Dept of Laborhttp://jobs4jersey.com/jobs4jersey/jobseekers/older/

Pathstonehttp://www.pathstone.org/services/training-and-employment-services/#Senior%20Training%20and%20Employment%20Services

Workforce 50http://www.workforce50.com/content/JobsByState/New-Jersey-Jobs.cfm

AARPhttp://www.aarp.org/work/job-hunting/?intcmp=FTR-LINKS-JOBRES-JOBHUNT

 

WINTER HEALTH 101, BY: HELEN HUNTER, ACSW, LSW

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

soupHelen Hunter is a Social Worker and Geriatric Case Manager who often writes for Renaissance Magazine (NJFA’s online magazine for seniors, boomers and caregivers!) which you can view at http://www.njfoundationforaging.org/renaissance-magazine/

Here is a piece she has agreed to share with us on the blog, which is very appropriate for the season. Be sure to read to the end for a quick recipe.

WINTER HEALTH 101

With all of this bitter cold and bone-chilling wind we have had recently, I thought I’d share some information to help you stay healthy this winter (and for the rest of the year, too!)

Colds and the flu are caused by viruses, NOT from being outside or due to the abrupt change in weather temperature. Rhinovirus (the virus that causes the common cold) actually survives from the late spring through to the early fall months, when the humidity is high. Since we are more apt to be outside during these months, exposure is less likely. Cold and flu viruses spread more in the winter due to close contact with people indoors.

You CANNOT get the flu from a flu shot! Flu is spread through direct transfer of the virus from an infected person when they sneeze, cough, kiss or shake hands with someone else.

You lose heat from any part of your body that is exposed to the cold and not covered with clothing. If you’re wearing warm clothing, but your head is uncovered, then the only place you can lose body heat is your head. So, in addition to wearing warm clothing, you need to also wear warm socks, gloves and earmuffs and/or hats to protect yourself. Protecting your extremities is crucial, since those areas are most vulnerable to frostbite.

The sun’s rays are not as strong in winter as they are in the summer. However, you can STILL get sunburn, even if it’s cold and cloudy, and when the sun’s rays reflect off snow! Protect your skin by using a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher and UVA/UVB blocker year round.

Pollen or ragweed allergies improve somewhat in the winter. If you are sensitive, however, to indoor allergens such as pet dander, mold or dust mites, your allergies may actually worsen! Sneezing or stuffy nose symptoms may be more problematic than usual during the winter season, so keep your home as clean and germ free as possible.

Eating chicken soup CAN fight a cold! Chicken soup may have a positive effect on the immune system and can bring white cells together, which help fight off infection in your body and help you recover faster if you become sick. So, ALWAYS have a stockpile of chicken soup (preferably homemade) in your refrigerator or freezer! In addition, hot liquids can also help reduce the symptoms of a cold or flu virus, relieving sinus and throat pain.

Hope this information is helpful to you in making sure that you go through the winter season and throughout the year as healthy as possible! Let’s all strive for a healthy body, mind and spirit EVERY day!

Want to make homemade soup? Here’s a quick recipe:

Chicken soup

Boil down all the bones with onions, garlic, carrots, celery and spices for a couple hours until all the meat that was left on the bones falls off and the bones have released their collagen (the gelatinous protein) and you’ve got homemade chicken stock. Strain it, pick out the chunks of chicken, add more ingredients like noodles or rice and new vegetables and you’ve got a pot of chicken whatever soup.

Encore Presentation!

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

 Encore Presentation!

 NJFA is pleased to announce that we will be hosting an Encore Presentation of two sessions offered at our June conference. If you were unable to attend in June or if you did attend and did not get to these sessions, now is your chance!

 Also, please send this along to any colleagues who may have missed out on our June conference.

 Space is limited! Register today!

 NJFA Fall Seminar Series

Monday, November 10th

8:30 am to 12 pm

Crowne Plaza Monroe

Aging in Place for All

Land Use and Complete Streets- Considerations for age friendly communities.

Karen Alexander, MPA, Managing Director, NJTIP @ Rutgers

Tim Evans, MS, MCRP from NJ Future

Recognizing and Adjusting Attitudes to Serve LGBT Seniors

Carolyn Bradley, Ph.D, LCSW, LCADC, Associate Professor Monmouth University.

 2 CEUS for Social Workers, LNHA/CALA, Activity/Recreation Professionals

 8:30 am        Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:00 am        Welcome

9:30 am        Program Begins

 Registration: $45

Please RSVP by November 3rd.

Name:______________________________ Organization:________________________________

Email:_______________________   Phone#:___________________

Payment:

?Check

Please make check payable to NJ Foundation for Aging, 145 W. Hanover St. Trenton, NJ 08618

?Credit Card

(Visa/Mastercard/Discover Only)

Name (as appears on Card) _____________________

CC #________________________________________

Security Code(3 digit # on back of card)___ Exp Date___

Billing Zip Code ____________

This program has been sponsored by The Reinvestment Fund

Questions? For more information, contact the New Jersey Foundation for Aging at 609-421-0206 or email mchalker@njfoundationforaging.org

Please return this form by November 3, 2014 to the email above or fax to 609-421-2006

Space is limited, register early!

 

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http://www.njfoundationforaging.org/

Medicare Open Enrollment Starts Today (Oct. 15th)

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Medicare Open Enrollment Starts Today (Oct. 15th)

Open Enrollment is happening now. From October 15th to December 7th you can make changes to your Medicare coverage.

What changes can you make?

If you are enrolled in Original Medicare, you can join a Medicare Advantage plan with or without drug coverage. These plans are private companies that are approved by Medicare and give you the services of Original Medicare. If you join a Medicare Advantage plan, you do not need to have a supplement plan (also known as a Medigap policy) and if your Medicare Advantage plan has drug coverage, you will not need a Part D plan.

If you are in a Medicare Advantage Plan, you can switch to another Medicare Advantage plan or drop your Medicare Advantage Plan. If you decide to drop a plan and not switch to another plan, you will be enrolled in Original Medicare.   You should then consider enrolling in a supplement plan to cover the costs that Original Medicare does not pay for and enroll in a Part D plan for drug coverage.

If you are in Original Medicare with a Part D plan, you can stay in Original Medicare and switch your Part D plan.

If you are in Original Medicare and do not have a Part D plan, you can enroll in a Part D plan.

Why You Should Review Your Coverage

It’s important to review your coverage before making a decision. And remember just because your doctor and medications are covered in your Medicare Advantage plan, supplemental plan or drug plan this year doesn’t automatically mean they will be covered in the coming year. Research studies show that Medicare recipients can save money if they review their Part D coverage. Make sure to confirm cost, copays, coinsurance, covered providers, and prescription drugs. Here are a few things to consider:

  • Has your health changed in the last year?
  • Is your current plan still meeting all of your health needs?
  • How much have you paid out-of-pocket in the last year—and for what?
  • How is your plan changing for the coming year? How will that affect your out-of-pocket        costs?
  • Are there better options available to you now?

There are many ways you can get assistance with this process. You can contact Medicare directly at 1-800-MEDICARE or at www.medicare.gov

You can also contact your County SHIP (State Health Insurance Program) by calling 1-800-792-8820 or visit http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/doas/services/ship/

NCOA (National Council on Aging) also has some useful information and tools. Like Medicare Quick Check, where you can answer some questions and you’ll get advice on choosing a new plan. Find it at https://medicarequickcheck.benefitscheckup.org/medicare-quick-check/?SID=543e7baa3cc91

In November, tune into Aging Insights to hear from the Senior Medicare Patrol of NJ, including Open Enrollment.

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