Posts Tagged ‘Physical therapy’

NJFA’s 14th Annual Conference aims to bring you evidence based and successful community outreach models.

Friday, May 18th, 2012

NJFA’s 14th Annual Conference aims to bring you evidence based and successful community outreach models. One topic being covered on June 14th is community health and wellness.

Exercise can decrease bone loss, increase bone density, and reduce your risk of fractures. Exercise is not only good for the bones but also for your heart health, prevention of diabetes and many more positive outcomes.

 A complete exercise program should include weight-bearing, resistance, postural, and balance exercises, according to Margie Bissinger, Physical Therapist and presenter at this year’s conference.  The NJ Department of Health and Senior Services offers safe, peer led exercise programs such as, “MoveToday” that contain all of these elements.

Move Today is a 30-45 minute non-aerobic exercise class designed to improve flexibility, balance and stamina. Participants assess their health, physical well-being and intent to make behavior changes before and upon completion of the program. The exercises and guidelines are based on current nationally recognized standards and science.

Exercises can be done while sitting or standing. Classes are led by trained peer leaders and meet weekly or bi-weekly for twelve sessions. Program features include:

  • A brief education component focusing on an exercise-related topic.
  • Inexpensive exercise bands to gain maximum effect from resistance exercises.
  • A major focus on good posture and falls prevention.
  • An exercise intensity scale and a weekly exercise log to track participant activity.
  • A self-assessment process for participants to assess their health, physical well-being and intent for behavior change given both before and upon completion of the program.

At NJFA’s Annual conference on June 14th, you can hear from, Margie Bissinger the physical therapist who helping NJ develop these programs, as well as two practitioners, Lois Yuhasz and Susan Galatz who are involved in coordinating Move Today programs.

For more information about the conference and how to register visit: www.njfoundationforaging.org/events.html or call 609-421-0206.

Medicare Myths

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

According to a study done by Prudential in 2009 37% of people think that Medicare will cover their long-term care costs. This is false. Medicare does not pay for long-term care. Medicare is also not free, there is a monthly premium associated with Medicare Part B.

Here are the facts about Medicare.  Medicare is for people 65 years of age or older (or people with disabilities). Medicare Part A (also known as hospital insurance) covers hospital stays, short-term skilled nursing care, hospice and home care services. Medicare Part A does not have a premium (if you or your spouse have paid Medicare taxes).

Medicare Part B (also known as Medical Insurance) does have a premium that is paid monthly. Part B covers doctor’s services, outpatient care, home care services and some preventive services.

Back to long-term care, what Medicare does cover, under Part A is Skilled Nursing Facility care on a short term basis. There are several guidelines for that coverage that you should also be aware of. After a 3 day minimum hospital stay, you are eligible under Medicare Part A for a short-term stay in a Skilled Nursing Facility, for rehab and nursing services. The goal is to get the individual strong enough to return home.

What Medicare Part A covers is up to 100 days of this skilled care at a nursing facility. You may not need the entire 100 days. The staff at the nursing facility will estimate the amount of time needed to rehabilitate the patient based on Medicare guidelines for Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapies, as well as, medical interventions given by nursing staff. It is also important to note that there is a benefit period associated with your 100 days of Skilled Nursing Care. This means that if you use your 100 days, you will not be eligible for another 100 days (even if you have another 3 day hospital stay) for 60 days. During those 60 days you must not have received any Skilled Nursing services. So, keep this in mind when planning your discharge from the Skilled Nursing Facility. Another thing to keep in mind is that after 20 days in the Skilled Nursing Facility you are responsible for a 20% co-pay per day. The co-pay is based on the per day rate approved by Medicare. If you have a supplemental or Medi-Gap policy, this may cover your co-pay, call your insurance plan to verify this. It is very important when being admitted to a Skilled Nursing Facility to provide all of your insurance information, including you supplemental coverage.

In closing, Medicare covers many inpatient and outpatient services through Part A & Part B, but they do not cover long term care, also referred to at custodial care. It is important to know what Medicare covers when thinking of your short term and long term health needs.

For more information visit:

 www.medicare.gov – to view the 2011 Medicare and You Handbook,

or call 1-800-633-4227 to request a Handbook.

http://www.medicare.gov/publications/pubs/pdf/10153.pdf – for a handbook on Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facilities

September 23rd is Fall Prevention Awareness Day!

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

September 23, 2010 is Fall Prevention Awareness Day!

For people over 65 years of age, a fall is serious thing. Falls and injuries from falls are a major threat to health, independence and quality of life. Every year 1 out of 3 older persons has a fall and most falls occur at home. With much focus on aging in place and finding ways for seniors to stay in their homes, preventing falls should be a vital part of that plan. There are steps you can take to make your home safer and prevent falls. Removing area rugs that can cause someone to slip or trip, as well as installing grab bars in bathrooms are some measures that can be taken to prevent falls at home. Someone who has already experienced a fall is also more likely to fall, so making lifestyle changes that can prevent another fall or serious injury from a fall are also important. For example, regular exercise can strengthen muscles, as well as, help with balance and gait. You’ll also want to talk to your doctor about the medications your on to see if any of them could be increasing your risk of a fall, also keep in mind that consuming alcohol while on medication could contribute to a fall.

Falls are often the cause of serious injury in older adults and can lead to a hospital admission. Preventing falls can be done, as stated above, by making your home safer. In addition to the things you can do yourself, you can also have an evaluation by a physical or occupational therapist for help and suggestions for preventing falls at home. Exercise is key to keeping your independence for many reasons, but also for preventing falls. You can increase your strength and build muscle to protect your bones, you can also make sure you have a steady gait when walking and improve your balance, which could all prevent a fall or lessen injury from a fall. Senior centers and other community centers may offer exercise programs geared toward preventing falls or that are tailored for older adults.

For more information about preventing falls and about Fall Prevention Awareness Day visit:                                                                                                    NCOA- Center for Healthy Aging- Fall Prevention Information: http://www.healthyagingprograms.org/content.asp?sectionid=149

For programs in New Jersey or to find your Senior Center start with your County Office on Aging:   http://www.state.nj.us/health/senior/sa_aaa.shtml