Posts Tagged ‘health’

Who is a Caregiver?

Thursday, November 1st, 2018

As we welcome November we also welcome National Caregivers Month. But, while it can be easy to recognize the month, it’s not always easy to recognize a caregiver. Caregivers range from the professional and paid to full-time non-professional caregivers to informal caregiving on a part-time basis. According to the Mayo Clinic, “About 1 in 3 adults in the United States provides care to other adults as informal caregivers.” Given the numbers, it’s almost certain you personally know someone who is a caregiver.

Provided by rawpixel.com via pexels.comBut who is a caregiver? A caregiver is anyone who provides help to someone in need. Anyone can be a caregiver, and caregiving is widely prevalent. Caregivers are diverse and consist of a wide range of ages, socio-economic backgrounds, genders, ethnic identities, locations, and caregiving arrangements. Despite how many people are caregiving, many don’t identify as “caregivers” because of their idea of what a caregiver is or isn’t. As a result, it’s important for us to recognize that not all caregiving looks the same. For instance, one caregiver might provide near-24 hour care, but another caregiver might drop off groceries once a week or organize medication; one caregiver might need to live with the person who needs help, but another caregiver might be providing help remotely from across the state or across the country.

As we continue to experience the “graying of America,” and our life expectancy rises, it’s likely many of us will become caregivers at one point or another. Being a caregiver is no easy task. While incredibly rewarding, caregiving is also often emotionally, mentally, physically, and financially taxing. Caregivers have been shown to be significantly more at risk for illness, depression, and other health conditions associated with prolonged exposure to stress. If you’re a caregiver it’s vital to take time to care for yourself.

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We want to celebrate caregivers and all they do. Caregivers are often the frontline advocate for their loved ones, working tirelessly to make sure the person(s) in their care is receiving all they need despite the impact on their own lives. We also want to remind caregivers to take care of themselves (see our “5 Self-Care Tips for Caregivers,” below). Being a caregiver can be one of the most rewarding experiences, but also one of the most exhausting times in a person’s life. Thank you to all of our caregivers, it’s your efforts that change the lives of so many and help so many live longer, richer lives in their community.

 

5 Self-Care Tips for Caregivers

Here are 5 vital ways for caregivers to practice self-care to rest, recharge, and revitalize!

  1. Take breaks every day—try a 5-minute meditation or any other practice that helps you de-stress
  2. Join a support group—in person or online.
  3. Do some self-massage to relieve accumulated tension
  4. Get enough: Water, Nutrition, Exercise, and Rest (caregivers often report a poorer diet and lack of adequate exercise and sleep)
  5. Know when to ask for help—watch out for signs of burnout and escalating health concerns; know when you need to ask for additional help from family or friends, or when outside agencies need to step in

Do you have a story about your caregiving experience you’d like to share? NJFA will be sharing stories in caregiving later this month for our 2nd blog on National Caregivers Month. To share your story, simply leave a comment on this blog or any of our social media pages, or email Communications Manager Mason Crane-Bolton at [email protected]

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It’s That Time of the Year—Medicare Open Enrollment

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

This week’s guest blog is provided by Charles Clarkson, Esq. This article, originally posted in issue #21 of the New Jersey Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) newsletter Advocate, will cover Medicare Open Enrollment, your options, and information about Medicare scams.


By Charles Clarkson, Esq.

Jewish Family Services of Middlesex County

Project Director, Senior Medicare Patrol of New Jersey

 

 

Every year between October 15 and December 7, a period known as “Open Enrollment,” Medicare beneficiaries can make changes in their Medicare coverage. The Senior Medicare Patrol of New Jersey (SMP), a Federally funded program of the U.S. Administration for Community Living, believes that if you know your options you can avoid being scammed and make the right choices, giving you the best coverage at the least cost.

 

Why make a change?  Whether you have Original Medicare (Part A and/or B), Part D (prescription drug plan), or a Part C (Medicare Advantage Plan,) your plan can change. Premiums, deductibles  and coverages can all change.  Even if they remain the same, your health or finances may have changed. SMP encourages all beneficiaries to re-visit their coverage and decide whether or not to change during Open Enrollment.

Beneficiaries have these choices:

  1. If you are enrolled in Original Medicare, you can change to a Medicare Advantage plan with or without drug coverage. These plans are private companies approved by Medicare and give you the services of Original Medicare. If you join a Medicare Advantage plan, you do not need (and are not permitted) to have a Medicare supplement insurance plan (also known as a Medigap policy) and if your Medicare Advantage plan has drug coverage, you will not need a Part D plan.
  2. If you are in a Medicare Advantage Plan, you can switch to another Medicare Advantage plan or drop your Medicare Advantage Plan. If you decide to drop a plan and not switch to another plan, you will be enrolled in Original Medicare. You should then consider enrolling in a Medicare supplement insurance plan to cover the costs that Original Medicare does not pay for and enroll in a Part D plan for drug coverage.
  1. If you are in Original Medicare with a Part D plan, you can stay in Original Medicare and switch your Part D plan. Medicare has a Plan Finder on Medicare.gov which allows beneficiaries to compare plans for next year. The new Part D plans should be announced in late September or early October.
  1. If you are in Original Medicare and do not have a Part D plan, you can enroll in a Part D plan. If you join a Part D plan because you did not do so when you were first eligible for Part D and you did not have other coverage that was, on average, at least as good as standard Medicare drug coverage (known as creditable coverage), your premium cost will be penalized 1% for every month that you did not enroll in Part D. You will have to pay this penalty for as long as you have a drug plan. The penalty is based on the national average of monthly premiums multiplied by the number of months you are without coverage and this amount can increase every year. If you qualify for extra help (low income subsidy), you won’t be charged a penalty.

 

Why change Part D plans?

Beneficiaries may want to change Part D prescription drug plans (PDPs) for a number of reasons: (i) the PDP has notified the beneficiary that it plans to drop one or more of their drugs from their formulary (list of available medications); (ii) the beneficiary is reaching the coverage gap (donut hole) sooner than anticipated and may want to purchase a PDP with coverage through the coverage gap, if one is available; (iii) the PDP has notified the beneficiary that it will no longer participate in the Medicare Part D program; (iv) the PDP will increase its premium or co-pays higher than the beneficiary wants to pay and a less expensive plan may be available and (v) a beneficiary is not happy with the PDP’s quality of service or the plan has received low rankings for a number of years. For 2019 beneficiaries in New Jersey can expect to choose from a number of PDPs.

 

Compare plans each year.

Beneficiaries should remember that PDPs change every year and it is recommended that beneficiaries compare plans to insure that they are in the plan that best suits their needs. When comparing plans, keep in mind to look at the “estimated annual drug costs,” i.e. what it will cost you out of pocket for the entire year, from January 1 through December 31 of each year. Plans can be compared at the Medicare web site:  www.medicare.gov. If you do not have access to a computer, call Medicare at 1-800-Medicare to assist in researching and enrolling in a new plan. Medicare can enroll a beneficiary over the telephone.  When you call, make sure you have a list of all your medications, including dosages. Another resource for Medicare beneficiaries is the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (known as SHIP), telephone 1-800-792-8820. SHIP is federally funded and can provide beneficiaries with unbiased advice.  Call SHIP to make an appointment with a counselor. You do not need to use a broker or agent who may not be looking out for your best interest. Brokers and agents are usually being paid to enroll you in certain plans. Beneficiaries can also call the Senior Medicare Patrol of New Jersey at 732-777-1940.

 

Medicare Open Enrollment can also be a time of fraudulent schemes that can cost you money. The SMP wants you to be on the alert for scams. A word of advice:

When you realize that a scammer is calling. Just hang up. Do not be polite and just hang up. Also, let your answering machine do all the work. Never answer any call unless you recognize the number. If no message is left, you know the call is probably a scam or an unwanted solicitation. For any questions about Medicare and to report any Medicare scams, call the Senior Medicare Patrol of New Jersey at 732-777-1940.

Staying Active—Go4Life Month

Thursday, September 27th, 2018

Did you know September is Go4Life month? Go4Life month is, “an exercise and physical activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging at NIH…designed to help you fit exercise and physical activity into your daily life.” Inspired by Go4Life month, we’d like to share with you some of our tips for getting into (and sticking with) a regular exercise and physical activity regimen. Below are 4 common reasons people often don’t get enough physical activity, and how you can combat them. As always, you should consult a doctor before engaging in a new exercise program, especially if you have any health concerns or medical conditions.

1. Always Feeling Too Busy
Do you always feel like you have too much going on? Like you don’t have time to be physically active? Instead of trying to fit in longer exercise and physical activity periods, try working in smaller periods of activity or working physical activity into your already scheduled activities.

Short exercise intervals have many of the same benefits as longer intervals.

Exercising as little as 10-minutes at a time has real health benefits. Try to set aside a few 10-minute intervals throughout the day to exercise. To get the maximum benefits for your body, try varying your exercises throughout the day. For instance, take a brisk walk in the morning and then do some body weight strength training in the afternoon. In the evening you could do some balancing exercises and a few good stretches for flexibility before bedtime. If you still find yourself unable to squeeze in dedicated exercise time work with the time you do have. If you have only a few minutes, use that time to exercise.

In addition to exercise, recent studies show we also need to be more physically active throughout the day. Being inactive for lengthy periods risk the potential to undo many of exercise’s benefits and can contribute to heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity, increased risk of falls, and feelings of depression and anxiety. There are many ways to get more physical activity into your daily life without disrupting your regular activities. Here are some to try:

Remember to move throughout the day.

• Take the stairs instead of the escalator or take the escalator instead of the elevator and try to walk at least a few steps if you’re able to do so safely.
• Clean your house
• Set yourself an alarm to get up and move for at least 3 minutes every 30 minutes, or at least 5 minutes every hour.
• Walk or bike ride to your errands or to work when possible.
• Have walking meetings and walking lunches at work.
• When meeting with friends and family, center things around some kind of physical activity, you’ll be a great amount of physical activity while you create wonderful memories.
• If you need to spend long periods of time sitting consider investing in a foot/hand elliptical machine that will keep you physically engaged while you sit

2. Motivation
Whether it’s lack of interest or physical limits getting in the way, it’s not always easy to be motivated to exercise or be more active. There are, however, several ways you can work around this and increase your motivation and your physical activity.

Do What You Find Fun
Not into running? Try recreational swimming. Tennis doesn’t interest you? Sign up for some dancing lessons. You love team sports? Why not look into local baseball, basketball, and bowling leagues?

If you haven’t found an activity or exercise yet that really engages you, don’t give up! Keep trying new activities until you find the one that fits your needs and desires. Maybe your local park or community college has a tai chi or yoga class, you could start a neighborhood team sports or running league, and the internet is a great place to search for local groups looking to meetup for a variety of activities for all ages and abilities. And while you’re trying new things and finding the right activity for you you’ll be doing yourself a double-service—learning and trying new things keeps your body and brain active!

Having an exercise-buddy is a great way to stay motivated!

Use the Buddy System
Exercising alone can be hard. That’s where having an exercise friend(s) can come in handy! There are a variety of ways to make sure you have the social motivation to exercise—you can have a regular meeting with a friend to exercise together, you can join a local league or group of exercisers, or you can sign up for a fitness class that gives you a standing commitment each week.

If you prefer to exercise alone, but still need the motivation of a friend, that’s no problem! Having an exercise partner to motivate you can be as simple as checking in with each other on a regular basis to make sure you’re meeting your exercise and activity goals. The best part about the “buddy system” is it not only motivates you, it motivates both of you.

Set a Reminder
For many people, getting into an exercise and activity routine is as simple as scheduling it. Download a fitness tracker on your phone or print an exercise calendar from online (you’ll find hundreds for free if you search “exercise calendar” or “fitness calendar”). Decide what activities or exercise you’ll do on which days and log them. Finally, set yourself reminders or put your calendar in a place where you’ll see it often. You’ll be surprised at how much more active you become!

3. Safety
It’s always important to be safe when being active. Whether you’re in perfect health, recovering from a setback, or dealing with a chronic condition, it’s crucial to be safe while still being active. Here are a few tips to keep you safe while you stay active:

Don’t Push Too Hard, Too Fast
If you’re new to exercise or if you’re coming back to an exercise regimen after a break, take it slow and be careful. Working out too vigorously can cause injury and further derail your fitness plans.

Listen to Your Body
Exercise is about finding the appropriate level of activity for your body, not pushing yourself to an extreme. Speak with a medical profession to talk about what activities are appropriate for you. Track improvements in your health and fitness and use those to judge whether or not your exercise and physical activity is too much. And if you’re experiencing pain due to your exercise routine stop and seek advice from a health professional.

Paying attention will keep your activity goals on track.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings 
Whether you’re inside or outside, make sure you pay attention to your surroundings as you’re staying active. Check the weather before you go outside and pay attention to changes in weather, insect activity, and pollen levels.

If you’ll be going outside, know the route you plan to take and how long you’ll be gone. If you’re going alone tell someone else your plans (or carry a cell phone) so they can be alerted if you need to call for help. And if the weather is cold make sure to wear layers—sweat cools off a body rapidly and can chill you after your body cools down from exercising. Watch out for cracks in pavement, fallen branches, or holes that could trip you or cause you to lose your footing. If you’re exercising indoors make sure you clear enough space for the activity you’ll be doing. Clean small objects off the floor you may trip over, and don’t exercise near furniture.

4. Expense
Money is a common concern and many people don’t have the money (or desire) to buy exercise equipment. They can’t afford monthly gym passes and may think they “can’t afford” to exercise. In reality, though, anyone can exercise, regardless of income! You may not be able to sign up for a membership at a fancy new gym, but there are ways to exercise and be active within any budget, including these:

Small free weights or dumbbells (like those above) are usually relatively inexpensive. You can also fill an empty water bottle or milk jug with water, sand, or pebbles for a free, adjustable weight!

Use Your Body
The freest and most available exercise equipment is your own body. You can take a walk or a run, practice yoga or tai chi, or strength train using your own body weight (think push-ups, squats, etc.). Of course, if you have equipment already, like a bicycle, go for a bike ride, or engage in other sports. If going outside isn’t a good option, walk around your house or engage in an activity like mall walking.

Cheaper Alternatives to Fancy Equipment
Another alternative is to look for cheaper equipment. Jumping rope is a very effective workout for your whole body, and jump ropes can be purchased for only a few dollars. You can also look at local used sporting goods stores and thrift stores or the web for used exercise equipment. You can even make your own weights out of soup cans and water bottles!

Less Expensive Ways to Learn
Check your local offices on aging, senior centers, and libraries to see what, if any, fitness programs they may provide and if any are available for free. If you have health insurance or Medicare check with your provider to see if you’re eligible for any free or reduced-cost gym memberships, fitness programs, or other health initiatives.

Other low-cost ways to learn an exercise are buying a fitness DVD or book, or checking one out from your local library. You can also look at websites like YouTube, which carries hundreds of fitness and exercise videos in a wide range of activities for people of all abilities, for free.

Get Going!
Increasing your physical activity and exercise isn’t always easy. There can be obstacles or setbacks, but the he benefits of physical activity and exercise are numerous: increased fitness and well-being, relief and improvement of many chronic conditions, improved mental health, social engagement, and beyond! Thank you for reading, now take a break from all this reading and get moving!

To find your local Area Office on Aging, call the toll-free number at: 1-877-222-3737

The New Medicare Cards

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

The New Medicare Cards

By Charles Clarkson, Project Director, Senior Medicare Patrol of New Jersey

In 2015, Congress passed the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act. This law requires the removal of the social security numbers from all Medicare cards by April 2019. This new initiative is referred to as the Social Security Number Removal Initiative (SSNRI.) A new randomly generated Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI) will replace the social security number. When the initiative gets underway all Medicare beneficiaries will be assigned a new MBI and be sent a new Medicare card.

The primary goal of the initiative is to decrease Medicare beneficiaries’ vulnerability to identity theft by removing the social security number from their Medicare cards and replacing it with a new Medicare MBI which does not contain any other personal information.

The new MBI will have the following characteristics:

i. The same number of characters as the current Medicare number, but will be visibly distinguishable from the Medicare number

ii. Contain uppercase alphabetic and numeric characters throughout the new MBI

iii. For providers, the new MBI will occupy the same field as the Medicare number on transactions

iv. Be unique to each beneficiary (e.g. husband and wife will have their own MBI)

v. Be easy to read and limit the possibility of letters being interpreted as numbers (e.g. alphabetic characters are upper case only and will exclude S, L, O, I, B, Z)

vi. Not contain any embedded intelligence or special characters

vii. Not contain inappropriate combinations of numbers or strings that may be offensive

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the agency that oversees Medicare, has established a transition period during which the Medicare number or MBI will be accepted from providers, beneficiaries, plans, and others. CMS expects the transition period to run from April 2018 through December 31, 2019. After the transition period only the MBI will be used.

Starting around April 2018, CMS will start mailing new Medicare cards. There are approximately 60 million beneficiaries in Medicare. So, CMS will probably mail the cards in phases over a period of time. Remember, as a beneficiary you can still use your current Medicare number during the transition period if it takes awhile to receive your new Medicare card. If a beneficiary is new to Medicare after April 2018 and Medicare has started issuing the new cards, the beneficiary will receive the new MBI. Therefore, healthcare providers must be able accept the new MBIs by April 2018.

Fraud and the new Medicare cards.

The Senior Medicare Patrol of New Jersey (SMP) wants all Medicare beneficiaries to be aware of possible fraud and scams relating to the new Medicare cards. Remember, CMS and Medicare will never contact you by phone or email to ask for personal information relating to the issuance of the new Medicare cards. Any such contact is a scam. Don’t be taken in. Also, there will be no charge for the issuance of the new Medicare cards. Anyone seeking to have a beneficiary pay money for the new card is a scammer. Be especially careful of anyone seeking to have access to your checking account to pay any fee for the new card. Beneficiaries are especially vulnerable if they are isolated, frail or may have cognitive loss. Caregivers should be on the alert for these kinds of scams. The SMP is currently educating beneficiaries at its outreach events of the issuance of the new Medicare cards. CMS will also be conducting intensive education and outreach to beneficiaries to help them prepare for this change.

The issuance of the new Medicare card is a significant change. If a beneficiary or caregiver has any questions about the SSNRI, please don’t hesitate to call the SMP at 1-877-SMP-4359 (1-877-767-4359) or 732-777-1940. A beneficiary or caregiver can also email me at [email protected]iddlesex.org.

Diabetes Self Management Courses

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

Holiday time can make it difficult to stick to your healthy eating plan, there are so many goodies to indulge in. And you want to participate and feel all the joy that comes from sharing a special meal with family and friends. With party after party, it can get tough. Even more so for those who need to watch their food intake due to a health issue. Particularly those with diabetes, all those sweet treats are hard to resist- holiday cakes and cookies around every corner.

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Having the right tools to manage your diabetes can help, not just at holiday times, but all year long. Luckily, our friends at HQSI (Healthcare Quality Strategies, Inc.) offer a six-week program to help people learn to manage their diabetes. Below is a schedule for the Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP) as well as more information and how to contact them.

If you do not see a program that is convenient to you, contact HQSI to ask about future programs. If you manage a Senior Center or other program and are interested in having someone come to talk to your group about diabetes, you can also contact HQSI directly to coordinate something. With a New Year beginning soon, it is a good time to plan and make new health goals.

Workshop LocationDatesTimeTo Register
Spruce Street Senior Apts.

15 Spruce Street

Kearny, NJ 07032

Tuesdays

 

January 10, 2017 to February 14, 2017

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

Call Sonia Salazar at:

(201) 997-4270

Elizabethport Presbyterian Ctr.

(Spanish)

 

184 First Street

Elizabeth, NJ 07206-1855

Wednesdays

 

January 11, 2017 to

February 15, 2017

9:30 a.m.

to

12:00 p.m.

Call Beatrice Beard at:

(908) 351-4850

YMCA of Newark and Vicinity

 

600 Broad Street

Newark, NJ 07102-4504

Wednesdays

 

January 18, 2017 to

February 22, 2017

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Sayreville Public Library

 

1050 Washington Road

Parlin, NJ 08859-1091

Thursdays

 

January 19, 2017 to

February 23, 2017

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

Call Jennifer at:

(732) 727-0212 ext. 25 or go to sayrevillelibrary.org

Franklin Township Senior Center

 

505 Dermott Lane

Somerset, NJ 08873

Wednesdays

 

February 1, 2017 to March 8, 2017

9:30 a.m.

to

12:00 p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Shore Medical Center

Jenkins Room

 

100 Medical Center Way

Somers Point, NJ 08244-2300

 

Thursdays

 

February 2, 2017 to

March 9, 2017

 

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

 

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Little Egg Harbor Township Community Center

 

317 W. Cala Breeze Way

Little Egg Harbor Twp., NJ 08087

Thursdays

 

February 2, 2017 to

March 9, 2017

10:00 a.m.

To

12:30 p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Church of the Holy Spirit

 

220 East Main Street

Tuckerton, NJ 08087-2242

Thursdays

 

February 2, 2017 to

March 9, 2017

1:30p.m.

to

4:00p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Annabelle Shimkowitz Senior Center @ Municipal Complex

 

330 Passaic Street

Passaic, NJ 07055-5815

Mondays

 

February 6, 2017 to

March 20, 2017

9:30 a.m.

to

11:30 a.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Montclair Public Library

 

50 S. Fullerton Avenue

Montclair, NJ 07042-2629

Fridays

 

March 3, 2017 to

April 7, 2017

 

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

 

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

 

For each six-week workshop, we regret that there can be no new attendees after the second session.

 

For more information, please contact Jarmaine Williams:  (732) 955-8168

 

 

WINTER HEALTH 101, BY: HELEN HUNTER, ACSW, LSW

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

soupHelen Hunter is a Social Worker and Geriatric Case Manager who often writes for Renaissance Magazine (NJFA’s online magazine for seniors, boomers and caregivers!) which you can view at http://www.njfoundationforaging.org/renaissance-magazine/

Here is a piece she has agreed to share with us on the blog, which is very appropriate for the season. Be sure to read to the end for a quick recipe.

WINTER HEALTH 101

With all of this bitter cold and bone-chilling wind we have had recently, I thought I’d share some information to help you stay healthy this winter (and for the rest of the year, too!)

Colds and the flu are caused by viruses, NOT from being outside or due to the abrupt change in weather temperature. Rhinovirus (the virus that causes the common cold) actually survives from the late spring through to the early fall months, when the humidity is high. Since we are more apt to be outside during these months, exposure is less likely. Cold and flu viruses spread more in the winter due to close contact with people indoors.

You CANNOT get the flu from a flu shot! Flu is spread through direct transfer of the virus from an infected person when they sneeze, cough, kiss or shake hands with someone else.

You lose heat from any part of your body that is exposed to the cold and not covered with clothing. If you’re wearing warm clothing, but your head is uncovered, then the only place you can lose body heat is your head. So, in addition to wearing warm clothing, you need to also wear warm socks, gloves and earmuffs and/or hats to protect yourself. Protecting your extremities is crucial, since those areas are most vulnerable to frostbite.

The sun’s rays are not as strong in winter as they are in the summer. However, you can STILL get sunburn, even if it’s cold and cloudy, and when the sun’s rays reflect off snow! Protect your skin by using a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher and UVA/UVB blocker year round.

Pollen or ragweed allergies improve somewhat in the winter. If you are sensitive, however, to indoor allergens such as pet dander, mold or dust mites, your allergies may actually worsen! Sneezing or stuffy nose symptoms may be more problematic than usual during the winter season, so keep your home as clean and germ free as possible.

Eating chicken soup CAN fight a cold! Chicken soup may have a positive effect on the immune system and can bring white cells together, which help fight off infection in your body and help you recover faster if you become sick. So, ALWAYS have a stockpile of chicken soup (preferably homemade) in your refrigerator or freezer! In addition, hot liquids can also help reduce the symptoms of a cold or flu virus, relieving sinus and throat pain.

Hope this information is helpful to you in making sure that you go through the winter season and throughout the year as healthy as possible! Let’s all strive for a healthy body, mind and spirit EVERY day!

Want to make homemade soup? Here’s a quick recipe:

Chicken soup

Boil down all the bones with onions, garlic, carrots, celery and spices for a couple hours until all the meat that was left on the bones falls off and the bones have released their collagen (the gelatinous protein) and you’ve got homemade chicken stock. Strain it, pick out the chunks of chicken, add more ingredients like noodles or rice and new vegetables and you’ve got a pot of chicken whatever soup.

Excessive Heat Warning This Week!

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

Excessive Heat Warning

With Summer in full swing, we are faced with high temperatures and high humidity all week! There is an excessive heat warning for NJ until Thursday June 9th.  Heat and humidity can become a serious health hazard, especially for children, elderly or those with chronic conditions, such as respiratory issues. Please remember to not only follow the above steps to keep yourself safe, but also check on family, friends and neighbors, again paying close attention to older adults, children and those who are ill.

 Conditions caused by excessive heat include dehydration, heat exhaustion and heatstroke. Heat exhaustion is a mild condition that may take days of heat exposure to develop. Someone suffering from heat exhaustion may have pale, clammy skin and sweat profusely. They may also feel tired, weak or dizzy and can suffer from headaches. Heatstroke can take just a few minutes to make someone very ill. A person with heatstroke will have dry, hot skin and a body temperature of 106 degrees or more, they will also have an absence of sweat and a rapid pulse. Someone suffering from heatstroke can become delirious or unconscious and needs immediate medical attention.

Here are some tips for staying cool and safe in the NJ summer heat!

  • Drink plenty of water or other non-alcoholic beverages.
  • Make sure children and the elderly are drinking water, and ensure that persons with mobility problems have adequate fluids in easy reach.
  • If you do not have air conditioning, spend time in air-conditioned places such as libraries, malls or other public buildings during the hottest hours of the day. Check with your municipality to see if cooling centers are available.
  • Wear loose and light-colored clothing.  Wear a hat when outdoors.
  • Avoid any outdoor activity during the hottest hours of the day. Reduce physical activity or reschedule it for cooler times of the day.
  • Don’t leave children, a frail elderly or disabled person, or pets in an enclosed car as temperatures can quickly climb to dangerous levels.
  • Talk to your health care provider about any medicine or drugs you are taking. Certain medications, such as tranquilizers and drugs used to treat Parkinson’s disease, can increase the risk of heat-related illness.

There may be a cooling center in your area or other assistance available for those who need to escape the heat. If you need more information or would like to find a cooling center in your area, Contact information for your County Office on Aging can be found at http://www.njfoundationforaging.org/services.html

To find a Senior Center in your area visit:

http://web.doh.state.nj.us/apps2/seniorcenter/scSearch.aspx

 To get more information from NJ Division of Aging and Community Services visit http://www.nj.gov/health/senior/index.shtml or call 1-800-792-8820.

Shared Sites

Tuesday, July 27th, 2010

At NJFA’s June 10th Conference, Donna Butts from Generations United presented a keynote on Shared Sites, serving diverse groups. Shared Sites are defined as “programs where older adults and young people receive services at the same site and both generations interact during regularly scheduled intergenerational activities.” Generations United refers to these centers as, “Intergenerational Shared Sites”. NJFA thought this was a timely topic as the use of space for intergenerational services is also a cost savings for many municipalities that are facing tight budgets.

Donna stated that Generations United feels the needs of children, youth and older adults can be meet and improved by sharing resources through shared sites. Intergenerational services also address the social implications of an increasingly age-segregated society. Some of the benefits of shared sites:

  • enhance quality of life for all participants
  • provides needed services to the community
  • increases cost savings & opportunities to share resources
  • enhances employee benefits for programs with on-site care (day)
  • attracts additional funding & positive public relations
  • improves attitudes about different age groups

Generations United also notes that children benefit from interpersonal relationships with persons from a different age group and report that they have “higher personal/social development scores than preschool children involved in non-intergenerational programs.” Likewise, studies show that seniors involved in intergenerational programs have positive health gains. Some of the services that may be included in a shared site are: childcare center, before/after school programs, early childhood programs, schools, youth recreation programs, camps, adult day services, assisted living/residential care settings, senior centers, and community recreation programs. Some examples include; Adult day program and child care program in same site, senior center located in a public school, after school programs held at a senior center or community/multigenerational center with programs for both generations.

In the powerpoint presentation that Donna shared in the breakout session at the conference, she highlighted the value of shared sites, including:

  • Best opportunity to build relationships and share resources between generations
  • Physical and financial resources used most effectively, maximizes grant investments
  • Significant local public and private appeal
  • A strong sense of place, create community focal points for service delivery
  • Incubators for new program development
  • Improves sustainability of programs

Donna’s keynote presentation was very motivating, feedback from attendees was positive and many attendees stated that they found her remarks inspirational. During the presentation, Donna gave many examples and talked about successful programs, also noting how to create a successful program. NJFA would like to again thank Donna Butts for joining us at the conference and providing such valuable information to all who attended.

For more information about Shared Sites or Generations United visit their website:

http://www.gu.org/