Posts Tagged ‘policy’

The 2020 Census and You

Thursday, June 20th, 2019

By Mason Crane-Bolton

 

2020 may seem like a long way off for many of us, but the 2020 census is just around the corner…and it’s a big deal. Capital “B,” capital, “D.”

 

What is the Census?

Here is a brief background on the Census (and why it’s important to New Jersey) according to Complete Count NJ:

“The Census is a count of all U.S. residents required by the Constitution every 10 years. The federal government uses it to allocate resources to state governments – more than $17.5 billion dollars to New Jersey every year. The Census determines congressional districts and state legislative districts. Almost everything we know about our population and our communities comes from information collected in the decennial census and its related surveys.”

The Census is especially important for how funding and influence are determined. The Census, acting as a marker for how many people live in each area and what needs they may have, determines what kind and how much funding each state receives, as well as how many representatives they may have. Therefore, it is especially important to have an accurate count for the Census.

So what are the issues and where do the problems lie? The answer is that getting an accurate count is not as easy or simple as it may seem.

 

Complete Count NJ expands on this problem:

“When New Jersey residents are not counted the state loses funding and influence.

The Census has historically missed counting people in Hard to Count (HTC) areas. Particularly vulnerable to not being counted: immigrants, people of color, urban residents, children under 5, people living in multifamily housing, non-native English speakers, and people who are homeless.”

These HTC areas can skew the numbers and demographics of our state and our country, making it seem as though we have a smaller population or that the demographics of different populations are smaller than they actually are (this also may make the percentage populations of other demographics seem larger than they are). It’s therefore extremely important to have an accurate count for our state.

 

What Can I Do?

Are you wondering what you can do to help ensure NJ has an accurate 2020 Census count? There are lots of ways you can get involved. Below are some of our favorites:

 

  • Talk to your colleagues about the 2020 Census and bring it to the forefront of your professional work. For those of us who speak to and with the public, it is vital to make sure the public is well-informed about the census. You can do your part by making sure you help inform the public about the 2020 Census and how vital it is they take part in it.
  • Talk to your friends and family about the 2020 Census. Just as it’s important to talk about the census in your professional life, you can do your part as well by talking about the 2020 Census with your friends, family, and neighbors. Help make sure they know how important it is to participate in the census and how they might get involved.
  • Get involved. If you’re interested in helping conduct the 2020 Census, you can be directly involved! The 2020 Census will hire many people to be involved in all levels of the Census—from people in the field to those in offices. You can learn more below about how to apply for these positions.

 

Remember, the 2020 Census will be the only nationwide census until 2030 and affects both funding and political influence for the entirety of NJ. Do your part and help get the word out about the 2020 Census!

 

Interested in Getting Involved?

 

If you’re interested in getting involved in the 2020 Census there are many ways you can do so. The Census hires part-time and full-time workers to assist during the Census—and some of these positions may become permanent.

 

If you’re interest in working for the Census, you can learn more and apply for positions here: 2020 Census Jobs

 

Learn More About the NJ Complete Count Commission: NJ Complete Count Commission

Learn More About Complete Count NJ: Complete Count NJ

Fund for NJ 2020 Census

 

If you have feedback or would like to be part of the conversation, leave us a comment below or email us as [email protected].

Come back for our next blog! New posts are published on the first and third Thursdays of each month.


Mason Crane-Bolton is Communications Manager for the New Jersey Foundation for Aging. His writing has appeared in EpiphanyUU WorldTo Wake/To Rise, and others. 

Announcing NJFA’s 18th Annual Conference!

Monday, February 29th, 2016

Announcing NJFA’s 18th Annual Conference!

NJFA will hold its 18th Annual Conference on Thursday, June 2nd at the Crowne Plaza Monroe. The 2016 Morning Keynote Speaker will be Ruth Finkelstein, ScD, who is an internationally recognized leader of inspiring and creating strategies for aging friendly communities. She is Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health where she also serves as the Associate Director of the International Longevity Center-Columbia Aging Center (ILC-CAC). At the Columbia Aging Center she currently leads the translation of interdisciplinary scientific knowledge on aging and its implications for societies into policy-focused practice in order to maximize productivity, quality of life, and health across the life course. The Luncheon Keynote is Karin Price Mueller. She writes the Bamboozled consumer affairs column for The Star-Ledger which often addresses senior scams. Karen is also the founder of a personal finance web site that offers smart and objective advice on everything money, NJMoneyHelp.com. She is the recipient of many national and local journalism awards.

The 2016 conference workshop speakers will include policy makers, direct care & clinical practice specialists. Topics include Hearing Loss, Dementia, Older Worker Programs and more.

More information and registration can be found on NJFA‚Äôs website at www.njfoundationforaging.org Limited vendor space and sponsorships remain, call us at 609-421-0206, email at [email protected] ¬†or check out the website for details.

The New Jersey Foundation for Aging (NJFA) is a public charity with the primary goal to empower elders to live in the community with independence and dignity.

 

To learn more about the work of the Foundation visit www.njfoundationforaging.org or call 609-421-0206. The New Jersey Foundation for Aging was established in 1998, its mission is promote policy and services that enable older adults to live in the community with independence and dignity.

Tips from NJ Dept of Banking and Insurance May Help Those Filing Insurance Claims

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

An article in today’s (9/1) Trenton Times by Jarrett Renshaw, Statehouse Bureau,¬†talks about information from the NJ Dept. of Banking and Insurance (DOBI) Commissioner, Tom Considine regarding the recent storm and insurance claims.

In a memo on Monday (8/29) the Commissioner stated that “Irene did not generate sustained hurrican-force winds, defined as 74 mph, but the time it got to NJ and told insurers they could not apply the hurricane deductible when calculating how much homeowners should pay for damages.”

So, what does this mean? It means, that homeowners across NJ could save a lot of money. Apparently, hurricane deductibles are much higher than the standard deductible on homeowner insurance policies.¬†According to the article, “The hurricane deductible is often a percentage of the property’s value, ranging from 1 to 4 %… for example, a policy holder whoe home is insured for $200,000 with a 2 % hurricane deductible would have to pay the first $4,000 to repair hurricane damage. But in this case, the homeowner is only responsible for the first $500 to $1,000.”

NJ State Law says a hurricane deductible applies when the National Weather Service measures sustained hurricane winds above 74 mph, Irene’s peak winds were 71 mph, a small difference in mph but a big difference in out of pocket dollars for NJ homeowners who were affected by the storm.

It is good to know when contacting your insurance company, that they have been notified by DOBI that Irene was not classified as a hurricane and therefore you will pay your regular deductible on your homeowners insurance policy and not the higher hurricane deductible.

The link below will take you to the NJ Department of Banking and Insurance Website where you can see more storm related updates or contact them for questions.

http://www.state.nj.us/dobi/division_consumers/insurance/hurricane.htm#after

Affordable Care Act (ACA) Facts: Follow this Series

Tuesday, February 8th, 2011

There is a lot of speculation and discussion about what affect health care reform legislation, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), will have on seniors and more specifically, Medicare.

Fact # 1 ACA will not cut your basic Medicare benefits.

There are actually some improvements to Medicare benefits as a result of ACA. One immediate improvement, according¬†to the Law,¬†is more help with prescription drug coverage. In Medicare prescription drug coverage there is something commonly referred to as ‚Äúthe donut hole‚Äù which refers to a coverage gap where seniors end up paying 100% of prescription drug costs. The new law helps you pay these costs right away. If you enter the donut hole this year, Medicare will send you a check for $250. You don’t have to do anything to get the check. It will arrive around 45 days after you reach the gap. In 2011, if you enter the donut hole, you’ll pay only half of what your plan charges for brand-name drugs‚Äîa 50% discount. By 2020, the donut hole will be slowly phased out and completely eliminated because of the Affordable Care Act.

Also as a result of ACA, a free annual well visit is now available in 2011. The free annual wellness checkup will allow you and your doctor to develop a prevention plan to keep you healthy. And a range of prevention services, such as cancer and diabetes screenings, will be provided free, no more cost sharing.

Another improvement related to the ACA, better care when you get sick! 80% of older Americans, have at least one chronic medical condition such as heart disease, high blood pressure, or diabetes. If you are one of them, you probably see several doctors, who may not always work together. The law will invest in testing new models of care for people with chronic conditions in order to provide better care, better coordination, and more patient-centered services. If you must be hospitalized, the law also will help you return home successfully, and avoid going re-hospitalization, by providing incentives for hospitals to make sure that you get the services you need in your community and by teaching you ways to take good care of yourself.

There are more facts that seniors need to know about how the new healthcare legislation will impact you and your Medicare coverage, stay tuned for more information from NJFA.

The information in this blog was gathered from language in the Affordable Care Act, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid and the National Council on Aging.

For more information check out the following links:

A brochure from Medicare:

http://www.medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/11467.pdf

Webpage from the National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD):

http://www.nasuad.org/affordable_care_act/nasuad_materials.html

Answers from the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a):

http://www.n4a.org/advocacy/health-care-reform/

Straight Talk for Seniors from the National Council on Aging:

http://www.ncoa.org/public-policy/health-care-reform/straight-talk/