Posts Tagged ‘winter’

Home for the Holidays

Thursday, December 20th, 2018

Mason Crane-Bolton

Winter¬†can¬†be¬†a¬†difficult¬†time¬†for¬†many…|Photo¬†by¬†Peter¬†Fazekas¬†via¬†Pexels.com

The Loneliness Issue

Loneliness is not a new problem, but rather a changing one. Like all social issues, loneliness is a problem bound to be affected by the other changes in our environment. Historically, loneliness and social isolation have been a great concern in the older adult population due to several factors: friends may have passed away, our health may deteriorate and make socializing extremely difficult, adult children or older parents may have moved away from one another, and long-distance communication has been more difficult to maintain. But there are changes on the horizon.

Several changes that have already come and will keep coming over the next several decades are such to impact the problem of loneliness among older adults. Some changes will be positive while others may have a negative or mixed impact. A quick list of just some potential changes include:

  1. The Digital Age will decrease social isolation—beyond email and chats, we’ve already seen the positive impact of services like Skype, which allows users to freely video chat with friends and family across the globe. The prevalence of cell phone technology means more people will be reachable and able to reach loved ones.
  2. The “graying of America” means we’ll have a much larger older adult population—this could have a mixed impact. The shifting demographics could mean our population of older adults will be harder to ignore and there could be greater calls (both intentionally and unintentionally) for an older adult focused society. However, a disproportionate number of older to younger adults could mean more older adults who become homebound and require care (physically as well as socially) with fewer able persons to assist—this could result in increased isolation and loneliness for many.
  3. Continuing advances in medicine may not only increase our life span, but also our quality of life. We may find ourselves perfectly healthy and mobile well into older adulthood and more able to socialize with family and friends old and new.
  4. Heightened desire and calls for the ability to age in place may add challenges to the natural socialization found in more communal living arrangements and may require extra attention be placed on socialization of older adults.

Bringing the Community Together

Community is at the heart of solving 
loneliness | Photo via Pexels.com

Loneliness is ultimately a community health concern in every sense of its meaning. It is a health problem not only affecting individuals of the community but affecting the community at large. It is, however, also a public health problem with solutions in communities around the state.  Community programs with a focus on alleviating loneliness can and should exist throughout our great state.

Many churches and local organizations do have community wellness outreach programs with at least part of the service focus being on wellness visits. These wellness visits usually focus on individuals who have a hard time leaving their home either for an extended period of time or permanently and provide social contact and possibly delivering food or other necessities.

Solutions for Loneliness

Even though not all solutions may be available for all people, there are different solutions and fixes for people struggling with loneliness.

  1. Getting involved in new activities is a great loneliness solution at any age or stage in life. Consider joining groups that interest you—whether it’s a hobby, an issue you care about, or a group with a similar ideology, being involved with a group will give you social connections now and for later.
  2. For those looking at assisted living or older adult communities, the close proximity to your neighbors can be a huge social boon. While the result can vary greatly between communities, living in a close, communal environment significantly increases a person’s chances of social contacts and new friendships (as opposed to living in a single-family home). Living in a close-knit older adult oriented community can also increase the likelihood that your peers will notice and reach out if someone in the community stops socializing.
  3. Although socializing on the internet can be risky, it can also be a great place to stay in touch with friends and family who are far away or rekindling old connections. If you use social media to reconnect with people or to make new connections, be sure you’re as safe as possible. Never give out any banking or personal information to a social connection. If you choose to meet in person use an abundance of caution and meet in a public place, preferably with an additional friend.
  4. Get out and take a stroll through the neighborhood, if able. You can see old neighbors and meet new ones and, as an additional benefit, outdoor activity and sunshine have been proven to boost mood.

Finally, as we get into the heart of winter and the coming cold, gray days, know you’re not alone! Loneliness and isolation is a problem faced by millions of Americans and many New Jerseyans. No matter your stage in life there are lots of ways to meet new friends and reconnect with old ones. Being aware of your loneliness is the first step—the second step is to reach out for help. Tap into your community if you’re lonely and see what resources are available to you. And if you’re an ally, get involved and reach out to others who may be isolated. Loneliness is a problem that can affect us all, but we can all fight it together.

No¬†matter¬†how¬†lonely¬†you¬†feel,¬†you’re¬†not¬†alone.¬†|
 Photo by Matthias Zomer via Pexels.com 

WINTER HEALTH 101, BY: HELEN HUNTER, ACSW, LSW

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

soupHelen Hunter is a Social Worker and Geriatric Case Manager who often writes for Renaissance Magazine (NJFA’s online magazine for seniors, boomers and caregivers!) which you can view at http://www.njfoundationforaging.org/renaissance-magazine/

Here is a piece she has agreed to share with us on the blog, which is very appropriate for the season. Be sure to read to the end for a quick recipe.

WINTER HEALTH 101

With all of this bitter cold and bone-chilling wind we have had recently, I thought I’d share some information to help you stay healthy this winter (and for the rest of the year, too!)

Colds and the flu are caused by viruses, NOT from being outside or due to the abrupt change in weather temperature. Rhinovirus (the virus that causes the common cold) actually survives from the late spring through to the early fall months, when the humidity is high. Since we are more apt to be outside during these months, exposure is less likely. Cold and flu viruses spread more in the winter due to close contact with people indoors.

You CANNOT get the flu from a flu shot! Flu is spread through direct transfer of the virus from an infected person when they sneeze, cough, kiss or shake hands with someone else.

You lose heat from any part of your body that is exposed to the cold and not covered with clothing. If you’re wearing warm clothing, but your head is uncovered, then the only place you can lose body heat is your head. So, in addition to wearing warm clothing, you need to also wear warm socks, gloves and earmuffs and/or hats to protect yourself. Protecting your extremities is crucial, since those areas are most vulnerable to frostbite.

The sun’s rays are not as strong in winter as they are in the summer. However, you can STILL get sunburn, even if it’s cold and cloudy, and when the sun’s rays reflect off snow! Protect your skin by using a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher and UVA/UVB blocker year round.

Pollen or ragweed allergies improve somewhat in the winter. If you are sensitive, however, to indoor allergens such as pet dander, mold or dust mites, your allergies may actually worsen! Sneezing or stuffy nose symptoms may be more problematic than usual during the winter season, so keep your home as clean and germ free as possible.

Eating chicken soup CAN fight a cold! Chicken soup may have a positive effect on the immune system and can bring white cells together, which help fight off infection in your body and help you recover faster if you become sick. So, ALWAYS have a stockpile of chicken soup (preferably homemade) in your refrigerator or freezer! In addition, hot liquids can also help reduce the symptoms of a cold or flu virus, relieving sinus and throat pain.

Hope this information is helpful to you in making sure that you go through the winter season and throughout the year as healthy as possible! Let’s all strive for a healthy body, mind and spirit EVERY day!

Want to make homemade soup? Here’s a quick recipe:

Chicken soup

Boil down all the bones with onions, garlic, carrots, celery and spices for a couple hours until all the meat that was left on the bones falls off and the bones have released their collagen (the gelatinous protein) and you’ve got homemade chicken stock. Strain it, pick out the chunks of chicken, add more ingredients like noodles or rice and new vegetables and you’ve got a pot of chicken whatever soup.

Heat and Energy Assistance

Thursday, November 10th, 2011

According to the federal government (US Energy Information Administration), heating bills are expected to increase slightly this season compared to last winter. Those who heat their homes with oil can expect to see an average of about $220 or 12% more this winter. Those households that heating with natural gas are expected to spend an average of $27 or 4 % more. While those heating their homes with electricity can expect to spend an average of $18 r 2% more than last winter.

For those who need assistance the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program or LIHEAP is now available for the coming winter season. LIHEAP is designed to help low-income families and individuals meet home heating and medically necessary cooling costs. This year, the application period is November 1, 2011 to April 30, 2012.  To apply for LIHEAP, contact the authorized local community action agency or community based organization in your area.  A list of these agencies is found at www.energyassistance.nj.gov.  For persons age 60 or over, or who are disabled, applications may be received and returned by mail.  Other households may apply by mail at the discretion of the local agency. People who participated in LIHEAP last year will receive a recertification form in the mail to renew assistance through this program.

To be eligible for LIHEAP benefits, the applicant household must be responsible for home heating or cooling costs, either directly or included in the rent; and have gross income at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.  The chart below gives specific monthly gross income maximums for FFY 2012.  Persons who live in public housing and/or receive rental assistance are not eligible unless they pay for their own heating/cooling costs directly to the fuel supplier.  The amount of the LIHEAP heating benefit is determined by income, household size, fuel type, and heating region.  This year, the medically necessary cooling assistance benefit is set at $160.

For further information on LIHEAP or to locate the nearest application agency, call 1-800-510-3102.  Additional information about LIHEAP, including an application, is also available at www.energyassistance.nj.gov.

  LIHEAP

MAXIMUM MONTHLY GROSS INCOME ELIGIBILITY LEVELS
FFY 2012

Household

Size

USF

Program

LIHEAP

Program

1 $1,589 $1,815
2  $2,146 $2,452
3 $2,703 $3,089
4 $3,260 $3,725
5 $3,817 $4,362
6 $4,374 $4,999
7 $4,931 $5,635
8 $5,488 $6,272
9 $6,045 $6,909
10 $6,602 $7,333
11 $7,159 $7,485
12 $7,716 $7,638
If more than 12, add: $557 for each person $153 for each person

 If you are above the following income guidelines, but still need assistance with your heating or energy bills you may be eligible for assistance through NJ Shares. NJ SHARES provides energy assistance to moderate and fixed-income households experiencing a financial crisis. Eligibility is based on household size and income. Their clients are families and individuals who do not qualify for Federal and State assistance programs due to the household’s income. NJ SHARES Grant amounts can be up to $700 for heating source (gas, oil, propane and electric heat), and can be up to $300 for electric service. Grants must result in continuance and/or restoration of service. Applicants must demonstrate a temporary financial need and a history of good-faith payments to their energy provider.

 Eligibility Guidelines

 Applicants Must:

  • Reside in New Jersey
  • Be experiencing a financial crisis, such as a job loss or illness
  • Be behind on their energy bill, or need a fuel delivery
  • Have income over the limit for Federal programs such as the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and state programs such as the Universal Service Fund (USF).
  • Have an income level that does not exceed 400% of the Federal Poverty Level
  • Have made a good-faith payment of $100 or more within 90 days of applying for NJ SHARES (for gas and electric customers; deliverable fuel customers are excluded from this rule)

Guidelines for Seniors and the Disabled:

  • Applicants 65 years of age or older, with households of one or two members, will be eligible for NJ SHARES if the maximum household income is $80,000 annually or $6,666 monthly. Proof of age is required.
  • Applicants receiving Federal Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits, with households of one or two members, will be eligible for NJ SHARES if the maximum household income is $80,000 annually or $6,666 monthly. Applicants must show proof of Federal SSD benefit.

 Required Documentation for NJ SHARES applications:

  • Documents should be furnished to the intake agency at time of application.

1) Proof of Income (last four consecutive weeks prior to application date)

2) Proof of Identification

3) Most Recent Energy Bill